Sunfish monitoring in Quetico Provincial Park

Cat Langille inspects the catch from a seine pull net. Credit: Jared Walter Stachiw

Cat Langille inspects the catch from a seine pull net. Credit: Jared Walter Stachiw

Quetico Provincial Park is near the northern most range of four species of sunfish – the pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), green sunfish (Leopmis cyanellus), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), and the northern sunfish (Lepomis peltastes). The northern sunfish has recently been assessed under both federal and provincial legislation to be a Species of Special Concern within the Great Lakes watershed, which boarders the Nelson River watershed (which includes Quetico Provincial Park),

By |July 22nd, 2019|Park News|0 Comments

Songbird and Wetland Bird Monitoring 2019

Jared Walter Stachiw and Cat Langille, Quetico Foundation Biology Interns/Quetico Provincial Park Assistant Biologists, paddling. Credit: Jill Legault

Songbird Monitoring update…1

Wetland Bird Monitoring introduction…2

An acoustic recording device setup at a permanent songbird plot in Quetico Provincial Park. Credit: Jared Walter Stachiw

Songbird Monitoring update:

By |July 17th, 2019|Park News|0 Comments

Acoustic Bat Surveys in Quetico Provincial Park

Big brown bat, Angell Williams CC BY 2.0

Bat surveys are done three times a summer with an ultra high frequency microphone that picks up bats ultrasonic calls. The survey crew, composed of Cat Langille and Jared Stachiw, canoe from The Pines on Pickerel Lake to the north shore of French Lake just after sunset, slowly following the shoreline to pick up bat calls while they do their evening hunting. Computer software is then used to identify the number and species of bats detected or “heard” along the route based on collected audio information.

By |July 4th, 2019|Foundation News, Local news, Park News|0 Comments

Results of Broadscale Monitoring 2010-2017

It is field season for biologists again, including our biology interns! Did you know that Broadscale monitoring is the standard aquatic ecosystem monitoring program in Ontario? Our Quetico Foundation summer biology internship program participants helped with the aquatic monitoring! That’s Amy Adair, 2017 biology intern holding a  lake trout shown in the broadscale monitoring summary!

More information: https://queticofoundation.org/research-and-publications/

By |June 12th, 2019|Foundation News, Park News|0 Comments

2019 Artist In Residence application deadline March 31

Photo credit: Cass Atatise

Enjoy creating wonderful inspired art in the wilderness of Quetico Provincial Park! Apply now to be a Quetico 2019 Artist in Residence, the deadline is March 31st. The Quetico Foundation can also pay for part of these travel expenses and initiated the artist in residence cabin. Please see https://queticofoundation.org/what-we-do/arts-culture/ for more information.

By |January 5th, 2019|Foundation News, Local news, Park News|Comments Off on 2019 Artist In Residence application deadline March 31

Atikokan Progress: Biology Interns Spending Summer Researching in Park

Quetico Foundation Biology Interns, Jared Stachiw and Katie Tripp, featured in an Article Progress article about backcountry canoe expeditions to do biology and forest fire data research in Quetico Provincial Park.

Online coverage http://atikokanprogress.ca/2018/08/21/biology-interns-spending-summer-doing-research-in-quetico-park/ and https://queticofoundation.org/atikokan-progress-biology-interns/

By |August 24th, 2018|Foundation News, Local news, Park News|Comments Off on Atikokan Progress: Biology Interns Spending Summer Researching in Park

Guest blog: Bat/bakwanaajii survey

Bat survey, Credit: Brian Jackson

Here are a couple pictures of Jessica Atatise taken myself, Brian Jackson, doing the bat/bakwanaajii survey funded by the Quetico Foundation (and yes, that is an official bat microphone pole).

By |August 2nd, 2018|Foundation News, Park News|Comments Off on Guest blog: Bat/bakwanaajii survey

Long-Term Salamander Monitoring

The Quetico Foundation’s Long-Term Salamander Monitoring

Blue-spotted salamander, Credit: Brian Jackson

By |August 2nd, 2018|Foundation News, Park News|Comments Off on Long-Term Salamander Monitoring

Pre-Prescribed Burn Vegetation Monitoring in Quetico

Credit: Katie Tripp

Forest fires are recognized as a crucial force in the dynamic ecosystems of the boreal forest due to their revitalizing impacts on the landscape. Fire is also essential for certain plants and vegetation communities to grow and thrive – this is the case for Quetico’s iconic red and white pines. Red and white pine are fire-adapted species that require fire to produce the environmental conditions necessary for them to reproduce and germinate. Frequent fires in the boreal forest also increases spatial, structural, and biological diversity, and reduces forest fuel loads thus preventing large, intense burns.

By |August 2nd, 2018|Foundation News, Park News|Comments Off on Pre-Prescribed Burn Vegetation Monitoring in Quetico

Historic fire research excursion launch

Quetico Foundation biologist interns Jared Stachiw and Katie Tripp heading out on another research trip. On this trip they will be surveying red pine stands along the northwest portion of the Park for old stumps to collect to be dated to assess the number of historic surface fires (see Red pine, fire and people for more info). This information will be used in developing an updated Fire Management Plan for Quetico over the next few years.

Katie and Jared head out to study red pine stands and collect historic surface fire data 1, Credit: Brian Jackson

By |July 17th, 2018|Foundation News, Park News|Comments Off on Historic fire research excursion launch